Author Archives: cinnabarreflections

About cinnabarreflections

B. Staffan Lindgren is Professor Emeritus at UNBC. Living in Nanaimo, BC. Jack of all trades trying to stay relevant.

Species, their names, and the people who named them.

Reading is a good pastime during the isolation most of us experience due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Recently I have been reading books that grapple with evolution, the species concept, and the naming of species (I also have read about … Continue reading

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“Return of the Wolf: Conflict and Co-existence” by Paula Wild

A book review “There’s an important distinction between management of wildlife and management for wildlife” Paul Paquet I have long had a strong interest in wolves and consider myself fairly knowledgeable about them. I have read a lot about wolves, … Continue reading

Posted in Biology, Conservation, Nature | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

The role of luck in life success

“In the last few years, a number of studies and books…. have suggested that luck and opportunity may play a far greater role than we ever realized, across a number of fields, including financial trading, business, sports, art, music, literature, … Continue reading

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The only constant in nature is that it is always changing

Humans are by nature conservative in the sense that we are most comfortable when our environment is stable. Change is frequently viewed as negative. One type of environment that is of conservation concern to European naturalists is the cultural landscape, … Continue reading

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Recommended Reads – For Rainy Days/Covid-19 Isolation Activity Part II

Here is my second installment of books that I have enjoyed reading. Nature’s Argonaut: Daniel Solander 1733-1782 by Edward Duyker. Melbourne: Miegunyah Press. 1998. 400 pages. Daniel Solander was the de facto naturalist on Cook’s first voyage, although Joseph Banks, … Continue reading

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Recommended Reads – For Rainy Days/Covid-19 Isolation Activity Part I

As someone with “underlying health issues” and a compromised immune system, I feel that the Covid-19 pandemic has really thrown a spanner in the works of my spring activity-plan. I am sure that many naturalists are in a similar situation. … Continue reading

Posted in Biography, Nature, Paleontology, Scientists | Tagged | 2 Comments

Observations by a Backyard Naturalist III: Insects

“Every kid has a bug period… I never grew out of mine.” Edward O. Wilson When we consider biodiversity, no single taxonomic group that we can readily observe comes close to the insects. The estimates of the number of extant … Continue reading

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Observations by a Backyard Naturalist II: Invertebrates Other than Insects

“The question is not what you look at, but what you see.” Henry David Thoreau For as long as I can remember, insects, spiders and other arthropods have fascinated me. Some of my earliest memories include watching huge European fishing … Continue reading

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Observations by a Backyard Naturalist I: Vertebrates

I am very fortunate to live in a semi-rural part of Nanaimo. From our living room, we look out at Richard Lake, a small, shallow lake surrounded by grass-covered land that gets flooded every winter. Extraction of peat appears to … Continue reading

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The inertia of science

Some of the greatest scientific advances have been made by maverick scientists; people who go off on tangents despite widely accepted existing paradigms. A paradigm is essentially an accepted framework that directs research to advance by an accumulation of solutions … Continue reading

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